My Apple Event Reactions

The Apple event yesterday unveiled the iPhone 6, Apple Pay, and the Apple Watch, which might be the biggest Apple announcement since the iPad. This event was big for me, however, because it was the first iPhone event after getting one myself, which finally gave me the experience of, “I gotta get me one of those.”

The previous 7 iPhone announcements were less meaningful to me since I had no basis of comparison. They looked cool, but all of them were well-beyond my flip phone. Looking at the new features and specs of the iPhone 6, however, I could feel how these improvements would change my life, despite my light usage of my current phone. It’s thinner. It has better battery life. The camera is fancier and stabilized in ways I don’t understand. It uses technology to make phone calls better, apparently. What’s not to love?

This has led me to the same crisis as every other iPhone user has experienced for many years before me of how to reconcile my desire for something new and shiny with the reality of an existing contract and the fact that I still have it pretty good with a 1 year old phone. It still feels new to me.

So I turn towards sour grapes to resolve the dissonance. Well, my current phone is better anyways. The new form factor is too big. My phone is already bigger than it probably needs to be, and the bigger screen would just frustrate my pockets. And I would be so worried about breaking the new phone that I couldn’t really use it to its full capacity. Things are totally better this way.

But if the apple fairy came into my house at night and swapped my iPhone 5S for an iPhone 6, would I be okay with that? Heck yes.

The Apple Pay thing was cool, but I think the real target of the event was the Apple Watch. After having talked to various people over the past day, it seems like opinions are spread, but the median is negative. It’s too expensive. It’s probably limited by phone tethering. It looks too big. It looks too small. It’s too rectangular.

I myself am more positive on it than not. With the caveat¬†that I am incapable of dressing myself (Julie does that for me) and don’t have any sense for fashion, this watch looks like something that people would want to wear. It offers customizability in something that one presents as part of their image constantly, and I think people care about that sort of thing.

I’m also not worried about the price point: Apple is snobby, and those unwilling to pay will have to wait for the price to drop, which I believe it will. For a completely new product, however, Apple has priced it high enough to detract people from using it just to give it a hard time. Only the rich and Apple fanboys will buy it, and that will give it snob appeal and positive user reviews regardless of the true experience. Apple seems to do a good job refining products, and I think the next iteration will improve while keeping the brand intact.

Of course, I’m not planning on getting one, but I’m excited to see how it goes. Detractors mentioned how derivative this product is and how other, cheaper products provide better, targeted experiences. I have to admit that I myself was hoping for something more exotic. Maybe it could have been something implanted in one’s chest like Tony Stark’s reactor, or something similarly mind-blowing. But it’s just a watch, and I think people will be more than happy with that anyways.

About my next computer: insert words in mouth, commence chewing

Since I wrote about how I have been moving to a desktop setup, I have been telling everyone that my next computer would be a Mac Mini. The specs looked good, and it would force me to walk away from my computer instead of lugging my computer around with me. Despite being on the computer more than half the time, I pretend to appreciate reality as well and want to step away from computers as much as possible*.

As of Monday morning, however, I feel as though I can no longer do that. That morning, all of the engineers were following live blogs of the WWDC keynote as they announced the new hardware. We moved on as soon as they moved onto software updates, but we were anxious to hear all about the new hardware. Apple announced a new Macbook Pro, a hybrid between the beefiness of the old Macbook Pro and the slim shape and the Macbook Air. The specs are great for a laptop, the retina display is by all accounts amazing, and it is on its way towards manilla envelope size. I admittedly don’t follow non-Apple hardware much, but I haven’t seen anything with the industrial design of this computer, and the specs are almost a kicker.

The skinny kids who didn’t get picked to play on either team during recess, however, were the Apple desktops, including the Mini. A few months ago, I was certain that the specs on it would last me long enough, but there’s truly no comparison with what the new MBP has. The difference in the specs is significant enough to my gaming experience that I think I need to go back on my commitment and get a portable computer.

It ruins my attempt to prove I’m “better” than a computer, but it is clearly the right choice. Except for price, it has the Mini beat in every respect. Thinking back to when I first got my current MBP, it had the slickest case design and the best specs. And it lasted me 5 years. I would give the same opinion of the new MBP and would certainly hope that it would also last 5 years.

The price will be what it is, but the surprising criticism of the new MBP is that is, in some sense, too¬†well engineered. Kyle Wiens, co-founder of the popular ifixit.com that shows you how to do repairs on your own hardware, describes it as the “least repairable laptop” in this opinion on Wired. Read for yourself for some contrarianism against the hype, but his main point is that Apple sacrificed repairability and upgradeability in literally gluing together the most compact internals ever, and by buying it, we’re supporting a future of light, thin computers with planned obsolescence as the battery slowly drains itself. If you don’t like that, the older MBP design is the way to go.

Most of the comments seem to dismiss this opinion, but I have taken it surprisingly seriously over the past few hours. On the one hand, I haven’t upgraded my MBP. If it were truly modular, I would have, but the graphics card alone is too specialized for me to want to swap parts. And of course, the new MBP is very thin and light. On the other hand, my hacker instincts tell me that I want the flexibility, and it actually has been useful. The battery in my model happened to be defective, and it was a simple exchange at the Genius Bar to get it fixed. And earlier this year when I thought my computer was dying, it was pretty easy to open it up and clean out the fan. Most of the wins of the new design don’t benefit my outlook, either. I have since purchased a 23″ external display that makes the retina display unimportant, and I think my desk can withstand the difference of a pound as my computer hopefully spends most of its time immobile.

At the moment, though, I’m having a hard time resisting the specs of the new MBP. The older design is cheaper, but it might need a few additions to bring it on par with the new specs. As Julie helpfully pointed out as she just saw me on the Apple Store, “[I] don’t need to decide by the end of the blog post.” And in truth, I actually really enjoy thinking about what hardware to buy. After waiting months for the newest revisions, I’m still uncertain.

At this rate, I might as well just savor the prospect of a new computer as long as possible and wait for a new Mac Mini.

*At some point recently, I sarcastically said something like, “Well, the physical world is just a substrate for the virtual world we actually live in.” That might be the scariest, most honest thing I have ever said.